Hello Guest  /  Join  /  Sign In  /  Get Desura
Platforms
Windows, Mobile, X360
Contact
Send Message
Licence
Public Domain
Release Date
Released Dec 31, 2006

Average Rating

8.9

Ratings closed

-

Microsoft XNA is a set of tools with a managed runtime environment provided by Microsoft that facilitates video game development and management. XNA attempts to free game developers from writing "repetitive boilerplate code" and to bring different aspects of game production into a single system.

Desura Weekly Release Highlights - Episode 34

0

Game

Desura Weekly Release Highlights - Episode 34

It's time to get shoulder to shoulder with our little yellow folder of games on offer this week through the Desura service.

Jul 22, 2014 News
Claustrophobia Development Log #14

0

Claustrophobia: The Downward Struggle

Claustrophobia Development Log #14

Featuring Character Creation, Archery, Skills, and English heatwaves.

Jul 18, 2014 Claustrophobia: The Downward Struggle News
Hyphen Post Release update

0

Hyphen

Hyphen Post Release update

A little update of where we are since we launched Hyphen.

Jul 13, 2014 Hyphen News
Asteria is now available on Valve's Steam

0

Asteria

Asteria is now available on Valve's Steam

Asteria is now available on Valve's Steam. We also updated the game to include 36 unique steam achievements and are also taking part in Steam's trading cards, complete with Steam emotes and profile backgrounds...

Jul 10, 2014 Asteria News
Vintage Year is on Greenlight!

0

Vintage Year

Vintage Year is on Greenlight!

Vintage Year has been put on Steam Greenlight! Help show your support!

Jul 9, 2014 Vintage Year News
Comments  (0 - 10 of 21)
Xylemon
Xylemon Dec 27 2013, 6:14pm said:

Public Domain? What?

+1 vote     reply to
garry68
garry68 Dec 14 2013, 4:56pm said:

I generally refer to XNA as a library, surely that's essentially what it is. A library of pre-written routines that are designed for graphical and timer based recursive programming.

Having recently had a look at Unity, surely it would be wrong for someone beginning to be under the impression that XNA is remotely the same thing.

Using XNA reminds me of the old Turbo Pascal, and Turbo C environments for some reason...

+2 votes     reply to
Jdawgg25
Jdawgg25 Jun 12 2013, 3:00am said:

Oh wait, XNA already supports .fbx! Sorry about that. The problem with XNA 4.0 is the with .fbx, it only supports the first animation take within the model. I figured out how to get multiple animations working somewhat with .fbx by splitting up the models into separate animation takes for the content processor to read them and then kind of merge them in the program.

+2 votes     reply to
Guest
Guest Sep 27 2013, 3:42am replied:

i thought when u make a .fbx u can make many animations just write down the frames it uses and then can call them

+1 vote     reply to
Jdawgg25
Jdawgg25 Jan 9 2014, 8:39pm replied:

Yes, you can have multiple animation takes within a .fbx model. XNA 4.0 by default pulls up only the first animation take; not the others within the model. To get it working within the XNA Framework, one way is to split the model into separate animations, and then merge them in the content processor. Here is a link that describes what I am talking about but better.

Metlab.cse.msu.edu

+1 vote     reply to
Jdawgg25
Jdawgg25 Jun 12 2013, 2:58am said:

Many XNA developers moved to Unity because it uses C# and they don’t want to spend the time it takes to create that same kind of game in XNA. It would take longer to create a First person shooter in XNA than it would using Unity, (unless you are using a 3d game engine built upon XNA like Digital Rune) because you have to hard code just about everything. That’s the goal of game engines, to help people save time developing games. XNA does make it easier somewhat to display 3d models with its Model class and Draw Method and display 2d stuff using the SpriteBatch but for the most part you have to do majority of the work yourself. If you are serious about publishing a game using Unreal Engine 3, you have to go through Epic games to have it approved because after all… it’s their game engine. It’s like the old saying, anybody can use Photoshop but designers use it well. Well same with game engines. Anybody can learn to import models into UDK, hit a play button and run around in first person and learn to use Unreal Script but professionals use it well. Regardless of what the media and many critics say about XNA being dead, I am still using it. People create their own engines or modify older game engines all the time. Brink uses a Modified version of ID Tech 4 which surprised me. Bring probably would have performed better and rendered all of its textures better with ID Tech 5 but ID Tech 5 came out much later. Many people moved away from XNA because they want to support the latest versions of DirectX. My game engine not only supports .X models and maybe not the latest version, but I programmed it to support obj, .fbx, and I am working on making it support .dae which are Collada files.

+3 votes     reply to
Jdawgg25
Jdawgg25 Jun 12 2013, 2:49am said:

Examples of Game Engines Built upon the XNA Framework or ones that work in conjunction are:

-Axiom
-FlatRedBall
-Digital Rune
Digital Rune is a 3D game engine for the Microsoft.NET Framework and the XNA Game Studio supporting windows, windows phone 7 and Xbox 360. See more by visiting their website (http://www.digitalrune.com/Products/GameEngine.aspx)

-SunBurn (This is a lighting engine for Xna and helps developers save time creating scenes and adding lights to their scenes. You have to pay for Sunburn)
-Visual 3D
-Ploobs (Visit their website at: Ploobs.com.br)

I could go on for a long time listing game engines built upon the XNA framework. Also Torque X Builder is a game engine that works in conjunction with XNA. I am creating a game engine called the Cyclone Game Engine but many call it Cyclone Engine for short. I chose to create my own game engine primarily to learn and educate myself about game engine development and to have a game engine I can call my own (especially if I needed a backup). There is nothing wrong with using other game engines but if you are serious about becoming a game developer, break out of the habit of strictly using one tool and try creating your own tools. Unity is free for the most part but you have to pay for additional features.

+2 votes     reply to
Jdawgg25
Jdawgg25 Jun 12 2013, 2:45am said:

When you install XNA, their are tools that come with it. They are the following:

-Microsoft Cross Platform Audio Creation Tool
-XACT Auditioning Utility
-XNA Framework Remote Performance Monitor
-XNA Game Studio Command Prompt

+2 votes     reply to
Jdawgg25
Jdawgg25 Jun 12 2013, 2:40am said:

Microsoft abandoned XNA but for the most part XNA is free to download, free to install on to Visual Studio and free to use. To port your game to Xbox 360 and test your programs on it, you have to download the XNA dev kit on 360 and it usually runs $100 per year to have this feature. It’s essentially a membership. You see this is great, because it allows anyone to test their games or programs on 360 for $100. That may sound like a lot but that is essentially your license with Microsoft to run the programs you create on 360. You see, years ago Homebrew games were illegal games ported to console platforms and the reason they were considered illegal is because many people porting their games they created to consoles like Xbox and PS2 did not have a license. XNA already existed. It was a dev kit for “Professional Developers”. So Microsoft create a free version of XNA for anyone to use in year 2004, before Xbox 360 launched. This diminished Home-brew games somewhat and allowed anyone to safely create games for 360 if they paid $100 per year. Check out MonoGames to port your XNA projects to other platforms. I recently found out about it.

+2 votes     reply to
Jdawgg25
Jdawgg25 Jun 12 2013, 2:38am said:

Just to be very clear, XNA is not a game engine. I don’t have any problems with people calling it a game engine but that doesn't fully make sense. XNA is not a game engine, it’s a framework. What I mean by that is, XNA essentially is a set of Helper Classes to help game developers save time programming their games. Those classes are saved into .dll files which are a set of library files. This is where I think Microsoft slipped up some on the “tools” part but I am starting to understand why I am confused when people are saying XNA is dead and turn to Unity. XNA does not come with features like tilemaps, particles, scripts, physics, level editors, etc. but if you are a XNA Community Member, you can go to their forums and download sample projects created by Microsoft to help you primarily learn about these things and save time creating your own. So you have to either create your own or use an existing engine built upon the XNA Framework. Unity is entirely a separate game engine of its own with its own physics engine, its own graphics engine, and its own support for multiple platforms, its own level editor… I think you get the picture.

+2 votes     reply to
Post a Comment
click to sign in and comment

Only registered members can share their thoughts. So come on! Join the community today (totally free - or sign in with your social account on the right) and join in the conversation.

2012
2012 Indie Single Player Adventure
A Virus Named TOM
A Virus Named TOM Indie Single & Multiplayer Arcade
ADDICT
ADDICT Indie Single Player Platformer
Akane the Kunoichi
Akane the Kunoichi Indie Single Player Platformer
Along Came A Spider
Along Came A Spider Indie Single Player Platformer
AlterEgo: DreamWalker
AlterEgo: DreamWalker Indie Single Player Arcade
Ancient Arena
Ancient Arena Indie Single & Multiplayer Arcade
Apple Jack 1&2
Apple Jack 1&2 Indie Single Player Platformer
Aqua Kitty - Milk Mine Defender
Aqua Kitty - Milk Mine Defender Indie Single & Co-op Arcade
Asteria
Asteria Indie Single, Multiplayer & Co-Op Platformer
Statistics
Rank
27 of 172
Last Update
1 month ago
Watchers
100 members
Games
124
Files
1
News
243
Features
6
Tutorials
1
Reviews
11
Share